PD Lab

Research into the diagnosis of Parkinson’s Disease

Parkinson’s    Disease    is    a    progressive    movement    disorder    which    affects    approx - imately   2%   of   people   over   age   65.   It   is   characterised   by   slowness   of   movement,     tremors,   rigidity   and   postural   instability,   along   with   a   range   of   non-motor   effects, and it currently has no cure. The   effects   of   Parkinson’s   are   due   to   neurodegeneration   and   the   loss   of   dopamine- producing    neurons    in    part    of    the    mid-brain.    Unfortunately,    by    the    time    that Parkinson’s has been diagnosed, 60%–70% of those neurons have already been lost. Diagnosis There    is    currently    no    definitive    diagnostic    test    for    Parkinson’s    –    diagnosis    relies entirely   on   observation   of   movement,   such   as   walking   gait,   hand   movement   and tremors.   This   means   unfortunately   that   accurate   diagnosis   is   heavily   dependent   on the      experience   of   the   medical   practitioner;   there   is   a   high   rate   of   misdiagnosis (upwards   of   25%);   and   typically   people   have   the   disease   for   many   years   before   it   is diagnosed. In   the   future,   neuroprotective   treatments   and   medications   may   be   developed   which slow   the   disease   progression.   However,   in   order   to   be   effective,   any   neuroprotective therapy will need to start early, before there is significant neuron loss. This   highlights   the   need   for   a   more   accurate   way   of   diagnosing   Parkinson’s   in   its early stages.

This project

The   aim   is   to   develop   an   accurate,   simple-to-use,   non-invasive   diagnostic   tool   for Parkinson’s   Disease   (PD).   Once   developed,   the   tool   will   be   freely   available   for   use   by the general population as well as health practitioners. As   far   back   as   the   19th   century,   telegraph   operators   could   recognize   each   other through   their   specific   tapping   styles.   This   suggests   that   keystroke   dynamics   contain sufficient information to serve as a biometric identifier. The     initial     phase     of     the     project     (this    website)     is     a     pilot     to     investigate     the characteristics   of   typing   (finger   movement)   which   change   in   people   with   PD,   and identify    whether    these    can    be    used    to    detect    the    disease.    Previous    work    has identified   characteristics   that   change   in   people   with   Parkinson’s,   but   the   question   is, how   accurate   are   these   indicators   and   can   the   techniques   be   applied   more   broadly as a detection and diagnostic tool? So   we   need   a   group   of   300   volunteers   for   this   phase   of   the   research   in   order      to gather more data.
 | Parkinson’s Disease Laboratory |  Research into better diagnostic tools | Copyright 2016  | 

Our Aim

This    university    research    is    to    develop    a tool   for   the   early   detection   of   Parkinson’s Disease,   by   util  ising   the   characteristics   of finger      resp  onses      when      typing      on      a computer.  You   can   help   right   now   by   participating   in the   current   project   phase   and   all   you   need to    do    is    install    a    small    research    app    on your   PC.   That’s   it   -   there   is   no   other   work involved.

Invitation

We   need   people   in   the   age   range   of   50   to 70   to   participate   in   this   research.   It   is   not important   whether   you   already   have   PD   or not   (as we   particularly   need   people without any     movement     disorder     as     a     ‘control group’   -   for   example,   a   spouse   or   friend   of a Parkinson’s-sufferer is ideal). You   have   shown   an   interest   in   Parkinson’s research     and     diagnosis     by    visiting     this website,    so    we    believe    that    you    may    be someone   who   is   interested   in   participating further. Please    get    started    now    by    installing    the research   app   on   your   computer.   You   can also see more details here .

Checklist for eligibility

  I am 50 or older   Either (a) I already have Parkinson’s Disease, or (b) I don’t, but still want to help   I use a Windows PC and use the computer regularly each month, for at least a few minutes each day e.g. for e- mails, web browsing and general typing   I am the only person who uses this PC; or several of us use the PC, but we each log on with our own separate account   Since this is a research project, you need to read and agree to the Participant Information & Informed Consent. Who we are PDLab    has    been    established    as    part    of    a university          research          study          being undertaken   by   Warwick   Adams,   at   Charles Sturt University, Australia.

We need your participation

Participating   is   really   simple   -   just   download   and   install   a   small   research   app   (called Tappy)   on   your   computer   for   a   couple   months.   It   asks   you   for   some   basic   details   and then   starts   analysing   your   finger   responses   as   you   type.   It   runs   in   the   background   and doesn’t affect the performance of your PC in any way.
PDLab

Research into the diagnosis of Parkinson’s

Disease

Parkinson’s    Disease    is    a    progressive    movement    disorder   which affects   approx imately   2%   of   people   over   age   65.   It   is   characterised by     slowness     of     movement,          tremors,     rigidity     and     postural instability,    along    with    a    range    of    non-motor    effects,    and    it currently has no cure. The   effects   of   Parkinson’s   are   due   to   neurodegeneration   and   the loss   of   dopamine-producing   neurons   in   part   of   the   mid-brain. Unfortunately,   by   the   time   that   Parkinson’s   has   been   diagnosed, 60%–70% of those neurons have already been lost. Diagnosis There   is   currently   no   definitive   diagnostic   test   for   Parkinson’s   diagnosis    relies    entirely    on    observation    of    movement,    such    as walking      gait,      hand      movement      and      tremors.     This      means unfortunately   that   accurate   diagnosis   is   heavily   dependent   on   the   experience    of    the    medical    practitioner;    there    is    a    high    rate    of misdiagnosis    (upwards    of    25%);    and    typically    people    have    the disease for many years before it is diagnosed. In   the   future,   neuroprotective   treatments   and   medications   may   be developed   which   slow   the   disease   progression.   However,   in   order to    be    effective,    any    neuroprotective    therapy    will    need    to    start early, before there is significant neuron loss. This   highlights   the   need   for   a   more   accurate   way   of   diagnosing Parkinson’s in its early stages.

This project

The   aim   is   to   develop   an   accurate,   simple-to-use,   non-invasive diagnostic   tool   for   Parkinson’s   Disease   (PD).   Once   developed,   the tool   will   be   freely   available   for   use   by   the   general   population   as well as health practitioners. As    far    back    as    the    19th    century,    telegraph    operators    could recognize   each   other   through   their   specific   tapping   styles.   This suggests   that   keystroke   dynamics   contain   sufficient   information to serve as a biometric identifier. The    initial    phase    of    the    project    (this    website)    is    a    pilot    to investigate   the   characteristics   of   typing   (finger   movement)   which change   in   people with   PD,   and   identify whether   these   can   be   used to   detect   the   disease.   Previous   work   has   identified   characteristics that   change   in   people   with   Parkinson’s,   but   the   question   is,   how accurate   are   these   indicators   and   can   the   techniques   be   applied more broadly as a detection and diagnostic tool? So    we    need    a    group    of    300    volunteers    for    this    phase    of    the research in order  to gather more data.
PDLab |  Research into better diagnostic tools for Parkinson’s | 

Invitation

We   need   people   in   the   age   range   of   50   to   70   to   participate   in   this research.   It   is   not   important   whether   you   already   have   PD   or   not (as   we   particularly   need   people   without   any   movement   disorder as    a    ‘control    group’    -    for    example,    a    spouse    or    friend    of    a Parkinson’s-sufferer is ideal). You   have   shown   an   interest   in   Parkinson’s   research   and   diagnosis by   visiting   this   website,   so   we   believe   that   you   may   be   someone who is interested in participating further. Please    get    started    now    by    installing    the    research    app    on   your computer. You can also see more details here .

Checklist for eligibility

  I am 50 or older   Either (a) I already have Parkinson’s Disease, or (b) I don’t, but still want to help   I use a Windows PC and use the computer regularly each month, for at least a few minutes each day e.g. for e-mails, web browsing and general typing   I am the only person who uses this PC; or several of us use the PC, but we each log on with our own separate account   Since this is a research project, you need to read and agree to the Participant Information & Informed Consent. Who we are PDLab   has   been   established   as   part   of   a   university   research   study being   undertaken   by   Warwick   Adams,   at   Charles   Sturt   University, Australia.

Our Aim

Our   goal   is   to   develop   a   tool   for   the   early   diagnosis of     Parkinson’s     Disease,     by     utilising     the     char  - acteristics    of    finger    responses    when    typing    on    a computer.  We    need    people    (both    with    and    without    existing Parkinson’s)    for    this.    You    can    help    right    now    by participating    in    the    current    project    phase    and    all you   need   to   do   is   install   a   small   research   app   on your PC.